Answering the Rape Culture by Broadening Definition of Manhood

Sexual assault awareness has recently become a large movement in many colleges and universities. Many of these programs, however, focus on raising awareness of potential victims instead of challenging the institutional ideologies that normalize sexual assault and rape. The United States Department of Justice defines sexual assault as, “any type of sexual contact or behavior
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Trafficking victims’ lifespan reduced to 7 years after becoming enslaved

Advertisements for sex trafficking in newspapers and online websites like Backpage.com help support a dangerous occupation that leaves victims with an average of seven years to live. Sex trafficking victims, especially children, are forced into the industry and terrible living conditions for others’ profit. According to a study done by Polaris, founder of the National
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Advertising for Sex Trafficking: Subtle, and All Around Us

Human traffickers use inconspicuous methods of advertising their business to gain customers. To combat their efforts, North Carolina activist groups and police forces have increased human trafficking awareness campaigns. As of June, there were 473 calls and 118 human trafficking cases reported in North Carolina, according to statistics from the National Human Trafficking Hotline, founded
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Popular Media Makes Trafficking a Simpler, More Sinister Transaction

When human interaction began moving to the internet and other forms of digital communication, sex traffickers began to use those methods to gain access to a whole pool of potential victims. Sex traffickers often utilize the internet and social media as a power tool to reach men and women, and children, in vulnerable positions. With
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Homeless Youth Prone to Trafficking; No End in Sight

The trafficking of young adults is not only a problem in poverty-stricken, developing nations, as the increased reporting and awareness in the United States and other developed countries suggests. Current studies indicate that the key to ending trafficking of young adults is to first eradicate youth homelessness. The U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness (USICH) released
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