Posts byMeghan Boggess

ACLU of Illinois: State Funding Cuts to Youth Services in 2016 Not an Option

As Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner and state lawmakers butt heads over the state’s fiscal health for the coming year, housing and other services for young-adult wards of the state are hanging in the balance. But the American Civil Liberties Union of Illinois, a longtime nemesis of the state’s Department of Children and Family Services, says
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Study Identifies 9 Steps to Cut Child Poverty by More Than Half

Child poverty could be reduced by as much as 60 percent by improving just nine existing federal programs, according to a new Children’s Defense Fund study. Children’s Defense Fund, a non-profit child advocacy group, suggested policy changes that focused on two goals: increasing employment and the value of work and meeting children’s basic needs “when
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Social Safety Nets Stemmed Worst of Great Recession but Kids Remain in Need

Nearly six years after the Great Recession, social safety net programs like food stamps and Medicaid have blunted the economy’s impact on children and families. But according to a recent report, a “slow and uneven” economic recovery means many low-income children are still in need. A report released Tuesday by First Focus Campaign for Children,
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Discovery to Begin in Suit Alleging Mentally Impaired Teen Forced to Confess

In a suit charging several St. Clair County Sheriff’s Department officials with forcing a mentally impaired teenager to falsely confess, two Northwestern University law centers, representing now 18-year-old Trevon Yates, are set to begin the discovery process as they await a court date. The suit, filed in late August against St. Clair County and seven
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Changes to No Child Left Behind Mean Greater Flexibility, More Realistic Goals for Illinois Schools

After every state failed to reach the original No Child Left Behind standard of proficiency for all students by 2014, a new waiver for Illinois will give schools more freedom with funding and higher standards. The new system, approved for next academic year, is less punitive, said Mary Fergus, spokeswoman for Illinois State Board of
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Can New Intelligence Center Crack Gun Trafficking in Chicago?

Several law enforcement agencies are joining at Chicago’s Crime Gun Intelligence Center, coordinating data and analysis in order to crack down on crime in the city. Summer spikes in gun crime are nothing new in Chicago, but this year the city has drawn more attention than usual after 11-year-old Shamiyah Adams was killed at a sleepover
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As Border Refugee Crisis Continues, Chicago Opens Door for Displaced Youth

Chicago may host as many as 1,000 additional Central American children by December, sheltering youth who could wait years to discover if they will be allowed to stay or sent packing. Already at least 429 children have been placed in Chicago shelters and 319 have been reunited with family members or placed with sponsors in the
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Obama Administration Eases Loan Repayment for Low-Income Borrowers; Skepticism Remains

For recent and future graduates, an expanded student loan program will make college costs easier to stomach, even as they continue to rise. President Barack Obama has signed an executive order that will expand Pay As You Earn (PAYE), part of the Federal Student Aid program, which puts a cap on monthly loan payments and
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Gov. Quinn Has First-of-Kind Proposal to Automatically Wipe Juvenile Records Clean

One basic tenet of United States law is that people are innocent until proven guilty, but that isn’t always the case for youth with arrest records. Even without a conviction or charge, a single arrest can still mark them as criminals, as employers opt for hiring youth with cleaner records. A proposal to automatically clear
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The Hamilton Project and Rethinking Mass Incarceration in the U.S.

Roughly one quarter of the world’s prison population sits in U.S. institutions, but experts say mass imprisonment is no longer a sustainable option—especially in the juvenile justice system. Early this month, the Brookings Institution released The Hamilton Project, a report detailing the social and economic consequences of U.S. mass imprisonment, as well as new alternatives to being
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